Zhenke Wu

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Zhenke Wu is an Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, and Research Assistant Professor in Michigan Institute of Data Science (MIDAS). He received his Ph.D. in Biostatistics from the Johns Hopkins University in 2014 and then stayed at Hopkins for his postdoctoral training before joining the University of Michigan. Dr. Wu’s research focuses on the design and application of statistical methods that inform health decisions made by individuals, or precision medicine. The original methods and software developed by Dr. Wu are now used by investigators from research institutes such as CDC and Johns Hopkins, as well as site investigators from developing countries, e.g., Kenya, South Africa, Gambia, Mali, Zambia, Thailand and Bangladesh.

Brenda Gillespie

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Brenda Gillespie, PhD, is Associate Director in Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research (CSCAR) with a secondary appointment as Associate Research Professor in the department of Biostatistics in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She provides statistical collaboration and support for numerous research projects at the University of Michigan. She teaches Biostatistics courses as well as CSCAR short courses in survival analysis, regression analysis, sample size calculation, generalized linear models, meta-analysis, and statistical ethics. Her major areas of expertise are clinical trials and survival analysis.

Prof. Gillespie’s research interests are in the area of censored data and clinical trials. One research interest concerns the application of categorical regression models to the case of censored survival data. This technique is useful in modeling the hazard function (instead of treating it as a nuisance parameter, as in Cox proportional hazards regression), or in the situation where time-related interactions (i.e., non-proportional hazards) are present. An investigation comparing various categorical modeling strategies is currently in progress.

Another area of interest is the analysis of cross-over trials with censored data. Brenda has developed (with M. Feingold) a set of nonparametric methods for testing and estimation in this setting. Our methods out-perform previous methods in most cases.

Adriene Beltz

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The goal of my research is to leverage network analysis techniques to uncover how the brain mediates sex hormone influences on gendered behavior across the lifespan. Specifically, my data science research concerns the creation and application of person-specific connectivity analyses, such as unified structural equation models, to time series data; these are intensive longitudinal data, including functional neuroimages, daily diaries, and observations. I then use these data science methods to investigate the links between androgens (e.g., testosterone) and estradiol at key developmental periods, such as puberty, and behaviors that typically show sex differences, including aspects of cognition and psychopathology.

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

Kai S. Cortina

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Kai S. Cortina, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cortina’s major research revolves around the understanding of children’s and adolescents’ pathways into adulthood and the role of the educational system in this process. The academic and psycho-social development is analyzed from a life-span perspective exclusively analyzing longitudinal data over longer periods of time (e.g., from middle school to young adulthood). The hierarchical structure of the school system (student/classroom/school/district/state/nations) requires the use of statistical tools that can handle these kind of nested data.

 

Matthew Kay

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Matthew Kay, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Information, School of Information and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Kay’s research includes work on communicating uncertainty, usable statistics, and personal informatics. People are increasingly exposed to sensing and prediction in their daily lives (“how many steps did I take today?”, “how long until my bus shows up?”, “how much do I weigh?”). Uncertainty is both inherent to these systems and usually poorly communicated. To build understandable data presentations, we must study how people interpret their data and what goals they have for it, which informs the way that we should communicate results from our models, which in turn determines what models we must use in the first place. Prof. Kay tackles these problems using a multi-faceted approach, including qualitative and quantitative analysis of behavior, building and evaluating interactive systems, and designing and testing visualization techniques. His work draws on approaches from human-computer interaction, information visualization, and statistics to build information visualizations that people can more easily understand along with the models to back those visualizations.

 

Anna Kratz

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Anna Kratz, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Center for Clinical Outcomes Development and Application (CODA) at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Kratz’s clinical research is focused on the characteristics and mechanisms of common symptoms (e.g. pain, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction) and functional outcomes in those with chronic clinical conditions.  Using a combination of ambulatory measurement methods of physical activity (actigraphy), heart rate variability, galvanic skin response, and self-reported experiences, her research aims to overlay the patient’s day-to-day experience with physiological markers of stress, sleep quality, and physical activity. She utilizes a number of computational approaches, including multilevel statistical modeling, signal processing, and machine learning to analyze these data. The ultimate goal is to use insights from these data to design better clinical interventions to help patients better manage symptoms and optimize functioning and quality of life.

Rie Suzuki

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Dr. Suzuki is a behavioral scientist and has major research interests in examining and intervening mediational social determinants factors of health behaviors and health outcomes across lifespan. She analyzes the National Health Interview Survey, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey as well as the Flint regional medical records to understand the factors associating with poor health outcomes among people with disabilities including children and aging.

Mingyan Liu

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Mingyan Liu, PhD, is Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Liu’s research interest lies in optimal resource allocation, sequential decision theory, online and machine learning, performance modeling, analysis, and design of large-scale, decentralized, stochastic and networked systems, using tools including stochastic control, optimization, game theory and mechanism design. Her most recent research activities involve sequential learning, modeling and mining of large scale Internet measurement data concerning cyber security, and incentive mechanisms for inter-dependent security games. Within this context, her research group is actively working on the following directions.

1. Cyber security incident forecast. The goal is to predict an organization’s likelihood of having a cyber security incident in the near future using a variety of externally collected Internet measurement data, some of which capture active maliciousness (e.g., spam and phishing/malware activities) while others capture more latent factors (e.g., misconfiguration and mismanagement). While machine learning techniques have been extensively used for detection in the cyber security literature, using them for prediction has rarely been done. This is the first study on the prediction of broad categories of security incidents on an organizational level. Our work to date shows that with the right choice of feature set, highly accurate predictions can be achieved with a forecasting window of 6-12 months. Given the increasing amount of high profile security incidents (Target, Home Depot, JP Morgan Chase, and Anthem, just to name a few) and the amount of social and economic cost they inflict, this work will have a major impact on cyber security risk management.

2. Detect propagation in temporal data and its application to identifying phishing activities. Phishing activities propagate from one network to another in a highly regular fashion, a phenomenon known as fast-flux, though how the destination networks are chosen by the malicious campaign remains unknown. An interesting challenge arises as to whether one can use community detection methods to automatically extract those networks involved in a single phishing campaign; the ability to do so would be critical to forensic analysis. While there have been many results on detecting communities defined as subsets of relatively strongly connected entities, the phishing activity exhibits a unique propagating property that is better captured using an epidemic model. By using a combination of epidemic modeling and regression we can identify this type of propagating community with reasonable accuracy; we are working on alternative methods as well.

3. Data-driven modeling of organizational and end-user security posture. We are working to build models that accurately capture the cyber security postures of end-users as well as organizations, using large quantities of Internet measurement data. One domain is on how software vendors disclose security vulnerabilities in their products, how they deploy software upgrades and patches, and in turn, how end users install these patches; all these elements combined lead to a better understanding of the overall state of vulnerability of a given machine and how that relates to user behaviors. Another domain concerns the interconnectedness of today’s Internet which implies that what we see from one network is inevitably related to others. We use this connection to gain better insight into the conditions of not just a single network viewed in isolation, but multiple networks viewed together.

A predictive analytics approach to forecasting cyber security incidents. We start from Internet-scale measurement on the security postures of network entities. We also collect security incident reports to use as labels in a supervised learning framework. The collected data then goes through extensive processing and domain-specific feature extraction. Features are then used to train a classifier that generates predictions when we input new features, on the likelihood of a future incident for the entity associated with the input features. We are also actively seeking to understand the causal relationship among different features and the security interdependence among different network entities. Lastly, risk prediction helps us design better incentive mechanisms which is another facet of our research in this domain.

A predictive analytics approach to forecasting cyber security incidents. We start from Internet-scale measurement on the security postures of network entities. We also collect security incident reports to use as labels in a supervised learning framework. The collected data then goes through extensive processing and domain-specific feature extraction. Features are then used to train a classifier that generates predictions when we input new features, on the likelihood of a future incident for the entity associated with the input features. We are also actively seeking to understand the causal relationship among different features and the security interdependence among different network entities. Lastly, risk prediction helps us design better incentive mechanisms which is another facet of our research in this domain.