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Ming Xu

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My research focuses on developing and applying computational and data-enabled methodology in the broader area of sustainability. Main thrusts are as follows:

1. Human mobility dynamics. I am interested in mining large-scale real-world travel trajectory data to understand human mobility dynamics. This involves the processing and analyzing travel trajectory data, characterizing individual mobility patterns, and evaluating environmental impacts of transportation systems/technologies (e.g., electric vehicles, ride-sharing) based on individual mobility dynamics.

2. Global supply chains. Increasingly intensified international trade has created a connected global supply chain network. I am interested in understanding the structure of the global supply chain network and economic/environmental performance of nations.

3. Networked infrastructure systems. Many infrastructure systems (e.g., power grid, water supply infrastructure) are networked systems. I am interested in understanding the basic structural features of these systems and how they relate to the system-level properties (e.g., stability, resilience, sustainability).

A network visualization (force-directed graph) of the 2012 US economy using the industry-by-industry Input-Output Table (15 sectors) provided by BEA. Each node represents a sector. The size of the node represents the economic output of the sector. The size and darkness of links represent the value of exchanges of goods/services between sectors. An interactive version and other data visualizations are available at http://complexsustainability.snre.umich.edu/visualization

A network visualization (force-directed graph) of the 2012 US economy using the industry-by-industry Input-Output Table (15 sectors) provided by BEA. Each node represents a sector. The size of the node represents the economic output of the sector. The size and darkness of links represent the value of exchanges of goods/services between sectors. An interactive version and other data visualizations are available at complexsustainability.snre.umich.edu/visualization

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Jason Owen-Smith

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Our data architecture combines naturally-occurring data from research grant inputs with scientific outputs including publications, citations, dissertations, and patents, as well as with biographic data on researchers scraped from the web and in databases. These data integrate with STAR METRICS administrative data on grant purchases and employment, which can in turn be linked to Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) Census data enabling individuals to be traced as they move across employers and start businesses. These data are then linked using cutting edge disambiguation/name-entity resolution, web scraping and entity extraction. This IRIS methodology is advancing the underlying computational sciences and creating more useful data for broader applications.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

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Gerald Davis

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My research¬†is broadly concerned with corporate governance and the effects of finance on society. Recent writings examine how ideas about corporate social responsibility have evolved to meet changes in the structures and geographic footprint of multinational corporations; whether “shareholder capitalism” is still a viable model for economic development; how income inequality in an economy is related to corporate size and structure; why theories about organizations do (or do not) progress; how architecture shapes social networks and innovation in organizations; why stock markets spread to some countries and not others; and whether there exist viable organizational alternatives to shareholder-owned corporations in the United States. Recent publications are available at http://webuser.bus.umich.edu/gfdavis/articles.htm.

Ties Among the Fortune 1000 Corporate Boards

Ties Among the Fortune 1000 Corporate Boards

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Jun Li

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Jun Li’s main research interests are empirical operations management and business analytics, with special emphases on revenue management, pricing, consumer behavior, economic and social networks. She has worked extensively with large-scale data, including transactions, pricing, inventory and capacity, consumer online search and click stream data, supply chain relationships and disruptions, clinical and healthcare claims. She is the Winner ¬†of INFORMS Revenue Management and Pricing Practice Award for her close collaboration with retailing practitioners in implementing best response pricing algorithms. Her paper on airline pricing and consumer behavior is the finalist for Best Management Science Papers in Operations Management 2012 to 2014. She is also the principal investigator of a National Science Foundation funded project: “Gaining Visibility Into Supply Network Risks Using Large-Scale Textual Analysis”. Her work has enjoyed coverage by The Economist, New York Times and Forbes.

Supply Chain Risk Events

Supply Chain Risk Events

 

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Ambuj Tewari

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My research group is engaged in fundamental research in the following areas: Statistical learning theory: We are developing theory and algorithms for predictions problems (e.g., learning to rank and multilabel learning) with complex label spaces and where the available human supervision is often weak. Sequential prediction in a game theoretic framework: We are trying to understand the power and limitations of sequential predictions algorithms when no probabilistic assumptions are placed on the data generating mechanism. High dimensional and network data analysis: We are developing scalable algorithms with provable performance guarantees for learning from high dimensional and network data. Optimization algorithms: We are creating incremental, distributed and parallel algorithms for machine learning problems arising in today’s data rich world. Reinforcement learning: We are synthesizing concepts and techniques from artificial intelligence, control theory and operations research for pushing the frontier in sequential decision making with a focus on delivering personalized health interventions via mobile devices. My research group is pursuing and continues to actively search for challenging machine learning problems that arise across disciplines including behavioral sciences, computational biology, computational chemistry, learning sciences, and network science.

Research to deliver personalized interventions in real-time via people's mobile devices

Research to deliver personalized interventions in real-time via people’s mobile devices