Zhenke Wu

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Zhenke Wu is an Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, and Research Assistant Professor in Michigan Institute of Data Science (MIDAS). He received his Ph.D. in Biostatistics from the Johns Hopkins University in 2014 and then stayed at Hopkins for his postdoctoral training before joining the University of Michigan. Dr. Wu’s research focuses on the design and application of statistical methods that inform health decisions made by individuals, or precision medicine. The original methods and software developed by Dr. Wu are now used by investigators from research institutes such as CDC and Johns Hopkins, as well as site investigators from developing countries, e.g., Kenya, South Africa, Gambia, Mali, Zambia, Thailand and Bangladesh.

Jun Li

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Jun Li, PhD, is Professor and Chair for Research in the department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics and Professor of Human Genetics in the Medical School at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 Prof. Li’s areas of interest include genetic and genomic analyses of complex phenotypes, including bipolar disorder, cancer, blood clotting disease, and traits involving animal models and human microbiomes. Our approach emphasizes statistical analysis of genome-scale datasets (e.g, gene expression and genotyping data, results from next-generation sequencing), evolutionary history, bioinformatics, and pattern recognition.

Ding Zhao

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Ding Zhao, PhD, is Assistant Research Scientist in the department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering with a secondary appointment in the Robotics Institute at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Zhao’s research interests include autonomous vehicles, intelligent/connected transportation, traffic safety, human-machine interaction, rare events analysis, dynamics and control, machine learning, and big data analysis

 

Gilbert S. Omenn

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Gilbert Omenn, MD, PhD, is Professor of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics with appointments in Human Genetics, Molecular Medicine & Genetics in the Medical School and Professor of Public Health in the School of Public Health and the Harold T. Shapiro Distinguished University Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Doctor Omenn’s current research interests are focused on cancer proteomics, splice isoforms as potential biomarkers and therapeutic tar- gets, and isoform-level and single-cell functional networks of transcripts and proteins. He chairs the global Human Proteome Project of the Human Proteome Organization.

Danai Koutra

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I develop fast and principled methods for exploring and understanding one or more massive graphs. In addition to fast algorithmic methodologies, my research also contributes graph-theoretical ideas and models, and real-world applications in two main areas: (i) Single-graph exploration, which includes graph summarization and inference; (ii) Multiple-graph exploration, which includes summarization of time-evolving graphs, graph similarity and network alignment. My research is applied mainly to social, collaboration and web networks, as well as brain connectivity graphs.

Qiang Zhu

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Dr. Zhu’s group conducts research on various topics, ranging from foundational methodologies to challenging applications, in data science. In particular, the group has been investigating the fundamental issues and techniques for supporting various types of queries (including range queries, box queries, k-NN queries, and hybrid queries) on large datasets in a non-ordered discrete data space. A number of novel indexing and searching techniques that utilize the unique characteristics of an NDDS are developed. The group has also been studying the issues and techniques for storing and searching large scale k-mer datasets for various genome sequence analysis applications in bioinformatics. A virtual approximate store approach to supporting repetitive big data in genome sequence analyses and several new sequence analysis techniques are suggested. In addition, the group has been researching the challenges and methods for processing and optimizing a new type of so-called progressive queries that are formulated on the fly by a user in multiple steps. Such queries are widely used in many application domains including e-commerce, social media, business intelligence, and decision support. The other research topics that have been studied by the group include streaming data processing, self-management database, spatio-temporal data indexing, data privacy, Web information management, and vehicle drive-through wireless services.

Elizaveta Levina

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Elizaveta (Liza) Levina and her group work on various questions arising in the statistical analysis of large and complex data, especially networks and graphs. Our current focus is on developing rigorous and computationally efficient statistical inference on realistic models for networks. Current directions include community detection problems in networks (overlapping communities, networks with additional information about the nodes and edges, estimating the number of communities), link prediction (networks with missing or noisy links, networks evolving over time), prediction with data connected by a network (e.g., the role of friendship networks in the spread of risky behaviors among teenagers), and statistical analysis of samples of networks with applications to brain imaging, especially fMRI data from studies of mental health).

Jeremy M G Taylor

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Jeremy Taylor, PhD, is the Pharmacia Research Professor of Biostatistics in the School of Public Health and Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology in the School of Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is the director of the University of Michigan Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit and director of the Cancer/Biostatistics training program. He received his B.A. in Mathematics from Cambridge University and his Ph.D. in Statistics from UC Berkeley. He was on the faculty at UCLA from 1983 to 1998, when he moved to the University of Michigan. He has had visiting positions at the Medical Research Council, Cambridge, England; the University of Adelaide; INSERM, Bordeaux and CSIRO, Sydney, Australia. He is a previously winner of the Mortimer Spiegelman Award from the American Public Health Association and the Michael Fry Award from the Radiation Research Society. He has worked in various areas of Statistics and Biostatistics, including Box-Cox transformations, longitudinal and survival analysis, cure models, missing data, smoothing methods, clinical trial design, surrogate and auxiliary variables. He has been heavily involved in collaborations in the areas of radiation oncology, cancer research and bioinformatics.

I have broad interests and expertise in developing statistical methodology and applying it in biomedical research, particularly in cancer research. I have undertaken research  in power transformations, longitudinal modeling, survival analysis particularly cure models, missing data methods, causal inference and in modeling radiation oncology related data.  Recent interests, specifically related to cancer, are in statistical methods for genomic data, statistical methods for evaluating cancer biomarkers, surrogate endpoints, phase I trial design, statistical methods for personalized medicine and prognostic and predictive model validation.  I strive to develop principled methods that will lead to valid interpretations of the complex data that is collected in biomedical research.

Pascal Van Hentenryck

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Pascal Van Hentenryck, Phd, is the Seth Bonder Collegiate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

His research is concerned with evidence-based optimization, the idea of optimizing complex systems holistically, exploiting the unprecedented amount of available data. It is driven by an exciting convergence of ideas in big data, predictive analytics, and large-scale optimization (prescriptive analytics) that provide, for the first time, an opportunity to capture human dynamics, natural phenomena, and complex infrastructures in optimization models. He applies evidence-based optimization to challenging applications in environmental and social resilience, energy systems, marketing, social networks, and transportation. Key research topics include the integration of predictive (machine learning, simulation, stochastic approximation) and prescriptive analytics (optimization under uncertainty), as well as the integration of strategic, tactical, and operational models.

The video above is of a planned evacuation of 70,000 persons for a 1-100 year flood in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Region using both predictive and prescriptive analytics and large data sets for the terrain, the population, and the transportation network.

Johann Gagnon-Bartsch

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Johann Gagnon-Bartsch, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Statistics in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Gagnon-Bartsch’s research currently focuses on the analysis of high-throughput biological data as well as other types of high-dimensional data. More specifically, he is working with collaborators on developing methods that can be used when the data are corrupted by systematic measurement errors of unknown origin, or when the data suffer from the effects of unobserved confounders. For example, gene expression data suffer from both systematic measurement errors of unknown origin (due to uncontrolled variations in laboratory conditions) and the effects of unobserved confounders (such as whether a patient had just eaten before a tissue sample was taken). They are developing methodology that is able to correct for these systematic errors using “negative controls.” Negative controls are variables that (1) are known to have no true association with the biological signal of interest, and (2) are corrupted by the systematic errors, just like the variables that are of interest. The negative controls allow us to learn about the structure of the errors, so that we may then remove the errors from the other variables.

Microarray data from tissue samples taken from three different regions of the brain (anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and cerebellum) of ten individuals. The 30 tissue samples were separately analyzed in three different laboratories (UC Davis, UC Irvine, U of Michigan). The left plot shows the first two principal components of the data. The data cluster by laboratory, indicating that most of the variation in the data is systematic error that arises due to uncontrolled variation in laboratory conditions. The second plot shows the data after adjustment. The data now cluster by brain region (cortex vs. cerebellum). The data is from GEO (GSE2164).

Microarray data from tissue samples taken from three different regions of the brain (anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and cerebellum) of ten individuals. The 30 tissue samples were separately analyzed in three different laboratories (UC Davis, UC Irvine, U of Michigan). The left plot shows the first two principal components of the data. The data cluster by laboratory, indicating that most of the variation in the data is systematic error that arises due to uncontrolled variation in laboratory conditions. The second plot shows the data after adjustment. The data now cluster by brain region (cortex vs. cerebellum). The data is from GEO (GSE2164).