Portrait of Jason Corso, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, inside his lab

Photographer: Douglas Levere

Jason Corso

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The Corso group’s main research thrust is high-level computer vision and its relationship to human language, robotics and data science. They primarily focus on problems in video understanding such as video segmentation, activity recognition, and video-to-text; methodology, models leveraging cross-model cues to learn structured embeddings from large-scale data sources as well as graphical models emphasizing structured prediction over large-scale data sources are their emphasis. From biomedicine to recreational video, imaging data is ubiquitous. Yet, imaging scientists and intelligence analysts are without an adequate language and set of tools to fully tap the information-rich image and video. His group works to provide such a language.  His long-term goal is a comprehensive and robust methodology of automatically mining, quantifying, and generalizing information in large sets of projective and volumetric images and video to facilitate intelligent computational and robotic agents that can natural interact with humans and within the natural world.

Relating visual content to natural language requires models at multiple scales and emphases; here we model low-level visual content, high-level ontological information, and these two are glued together with an adaptive graphical structure at the mid-level.

Relating visual content to natural language requires models at multiple scales and emphases; here we model low-level visual content, high-level ontological information, and these two are glued together with an adaptive graphical structure at the mid-level.

ortiz-small

Luis E. Ortiz

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The study of large complex systems of structured strategic interaction, such as economic, social, biological, financial, or large computer networks, provides substantial opportunities for fundamental computational and scientific contributions. My research focuses on problems emerging from the study of systems involving the interaction of a large number of “entities,” which is my way of abstractly and generally capturing individuals, institutions, corporations, biological organisms, or even the individual chemical components of which they are made (e.g., proteins and DNA). Current technology has facilitated the collection and public availability of vasts amounts of data, particularly capturing system behavior at fine levels of granularity. In my group, we study behavioral data of strategic nature at big data levels. One of our main objectives is to develop computational tools for data science, and in particular learning large-population models from such big sources of behavioral data that we can later use to study, analyze, predict and alter future system behavior at a variety of scales, and thus improve the overall efficiency of real-world complex systems (e.g., the smart grid, social and political networks, independent security and defense systems, and microfinance markets, to name a few).

Name: Danai Koutra
Uniqname: dkoutra
Department: EECS
 
Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing
 
www.engin.umich.edu

Danai Koutra

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I develop fast and principled methods for exploring and understanding one or more massive graphs. In addition to fast algorithmic methodologies, my research also contributes graph-theoretical ideas and models, and real-world applications in two main areas: (i) Single-graph exploration, which includes graph summarization and inference; (ii) Multiple-graph exploration, which includes summarization of time-evolving graphs, graph similarity and network alignment. My research is applied mainly to social, collaboration and web networks, as well as brain connectivity graphs.