ebruch

Elizabeth Bruch

By | | No Comments

 

People’s behavior is often contingent on what other people are doing or have done. In dating and job markets, for example, each person’s choices limit what opportunities are available to others. A classic problem in sociology is explaining the relationship between individuals’ actions and larger-scale social patterns. My strategy is to use computer models of how people’s choices co-evolve with aspects of their environment—known as agent-based models (ABMs)—to determine what behavioral or demographic features are important for understanding social processes. I then use statistical models to assess to what degree these features exist in the real world. Substantively, most of my work examines the drivers of neighborhood segregation. More recently, I embarked on a study of how mate choice strategies shape (and are shaped by) dating, marriage, and affair markets.

With Fred Feinberg (UM Marketing and Statistics), I am also exploring how new data sources can be combined with choice models. The vast amounts of activity data from sources such as cell phones and the Internet make it possible to study human behavior with an unparalleled richness of detail. Such “big data” are interesting in large part because they are behavioral data that allow us to observe how people explore their environment, engage in novel or habitual behaviors, interact with others, and learn from past experiences. In ongoing work, we show how decision processes regarding mate choice can be extracted from online dating activity data.

 

 

Greg_Rybarczyk

Greg Rybarczyk

By | | No Comments

Using GIS, visual analytics, and spatiotemporal modeling, Dr. Rybarczyk examines the utility of Big Data for gaining insight into the causal mechanisms that influence travel patterns and urban dynamics. In particular, his research sets out to provide a fuller understanding of “what” and “where” micro-scale conditions affect human sentiment and hence wayfinding ability, movement patterns, and travel mode-choices.

Recent works: Rybarczyk, G. and S. Banerjee. (2015) Visualizing active travel sentiment in an urban context, Journal of Transport and Health, 2(2): 30

xu-small

Ming Xu

By | | No Comments

My research focuses on developing and applying computational and data-enabled methodology in the broader area of sustainability. Main thrusts are as follows:

1. Human mobility dynamics. I am interested in mining large-scale real-world travel trajectory data to understand human mobility dynamics. This involves the processing and analyzing travel trajectory data, characterizing individual mobility patterns, and evaluating environmental impacts of transportation systems/technologies (e.g., electric vehicles, ride-sharing) based on individual mobility dynamics.

2. Global supply chains. Increasingly intensified international trade has created a connected global supply chain network. I am interested in understanding the structure of the global supply chain network and economic/environmental performance of nations.

3. Networked infrastructure systems. Many infrastructure systems (e.g., power grid, water supply infrastructure) are networked systems. I am interested in understanding the basic structural features of these systems and how they relate to the system-level properties (e.g., stability, resilience, sustainability).

A network visualization (force-directed graph) of the 2012 US economy using the industry-by-industry Input-Output Table (15 sectors) provided by BEA. Each node represents a sector. The size of the node represents the economic output of the sector. The size and darkness of links represent the value of exchanges of goods/services between sectors. An interactive version and other data visualizations are available at http://complexsustainability.snre.umich.edu/visualization

A network visualization (force-directed graph) of the 2012 US economy using the industry-by-industry Input-Output Table (15 sectors) provided by BEA. Each node represents a sector. The size of the node represents the economic output of the sector. The size and darkness of links represent the value of exchanges of goods/services between sectors. An interactive version and other data visualizations are available at complexsustainability.snre.umich.edu/visualization

danbrown-small

Daniel Brown

By | | No Comments

 

Research interests focus on land use change and its effects on ecosystems and on human vulnerability. This work connects simulation (e.g., agent-based modeling) of land-use-change processes with GIS and remote sensing based data on historical patterns of landscape change and social surveys. We are also working to understand the ways in which land-use decisions are made and to evaluate consequences of change.