Mert Pilanci

By |

I’m an assistant professor in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

Prior to joining University of Michigan, I was a Math+X postdoctoral fellow working with Emmanuel Candes at Stanford University. I received my Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from UC Berkeley in 2016. My Ph.D. advisors were Martin Wainwright and Laurent El Ghaoui, and my studies were supported partially by a Microsoft Research PhD Fellowship.

Research Interests: Large Scale OptimizationMachine Learning and Big DataSignal ProcessingCompressed SensingInformation Theory and Polar Coding

Michelle Aebersold

By |

Michelle Aebersold, PhD, is Clinical Associate Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Aebersold’s professional and academic career is focused on advancing the science of learning applied in simulation to align clinician and student practice behaviors with research evidence to improve learner and health outcomes.  She focuses her scholarship in both high fidelity and virtual reality simulation and is a national leader and expert in simulation. Her scholarship has culminated in developing the Simulation Model to Improve Learner and Health Outcomes (SMILHO).

Current Research Grants and Programs:

  • Closing the loop: new data tools for measuring change in the quality for nursing education and the value of new approaches to instruction (PI) University of Michigan School of Nursing.
  • Interactive anatomy-augmented virtual simulation training (PI with Voepel-Lewis) Archie MD Award Number 045889

Zhenke Wu

By |

Zhenke Wu is an Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, and Research Assistant Professor in Michigan Institute of Data Science (MIDAS). He received his Ph.D. in Biostatistics from the Johns Hopkins University in 2014 and then stayed at Hopkins for his postdoctoral training before joining the University of Michigan. Dr. Wu’s research focuses on the design and application of statistical methods that inform health decisions made by individuals, or precision medicine. The original methods and software developed by Dr. Wu are now used by investigators from research institutes such as CDC and Johns Hopkins, as well as site investigators from developing countries, e.g., Kenya, South Africa, Gambia, Mali, Zambia, Thailand and Bangladesh.

Yang Chen

By |

Yang Chen received her Ph.D. (2017) in Statistics from Harvard University and then joined the University of Michigan as an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Research Assistant Professor at the Michigan Institute of Data Science (MIDAS). She received her B.A. in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics from the University of Science and Technology of China. Research interests include computational algorithms in statistical inference and applied statistics in the field of biology and astronomy.

Bhramar Mukherjee

By |

Bhramar Mukherjee is  a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics, joining the department in Fall, 2006. Bhramar is also a Professor in the Department of Epidemiology. Bhramar completed her Ph.D. in 2001 from Purdue University. Bhramar’s principal research interests lie in Bayesian methods in epidemiology and studies of gene-environment interaction. She is also interested in modeling missingness in exposure, categorical data models, Bayesian nonparametrics, and the general area of statistical inference under outcome/exposure dependent sampling schemes. Bhramar’s methodological research is funded by NSF and NIH.   Bhramar is involved as a co-investigator in several R01s led by faculty in Internal Medicine, Epidemiology and Environment Health sciences at UM. Her collaborative interests focus on genetic and environmental epidemiology, ranging from investigating the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer in relation to environmental exposures to studies of air pollution on pediatric Asthma events in Detroit. She is actively engaged in Global Health Research.

Adriene Beltz

By |

The goal of my research is to leverage network analysis techniques to uncover how the brain mediates sex hormone influences on gendered behavior across the lifespan. Specifically, my data science research concerns the creation and application of person-specific connectivity analyses, such as unified structural equation models, to time series data; these are intensive longitudinal data, including functional neuroimages, daily diaries, and observations. I then use these data science methods to investigate the links between androgens (e.g., testosterone) and estradiol at key developmental periods, such as puberty, and behaviors that typically show sex differences, including aspects of cognition and psychopathology.

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

Stephanie Teasley

By |

Dr. Teasley’s research has focused on issues of collaboration and learning, looking specifically at how sociotechnical systems can be used to support effective collaborative processes and successful learning outcomes. As Director of the LED lab, she leads learning analytics-based research to investigate how instructional technologies and digital media are used to innovate teaching, learning, and collaboration. The LED Lab is committed to providing a significant contribution to scholarship about learning at Michigan and in the broader field as well, by building an empirical evidentiary base for the design and support of technology rich learning environments.

Pascal Van Hentenryck

By |

Pascal Van Hentenryck, Phd, is the Seth Bonder Collegiate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

His research is concerned with evidence-based optimization, the idea of optimizing complex systems holistically, exploiting the unprecedented amount of available data. It is driven by an exciting convergence of ideas in big data, predictive analytics, and large-scale optimization (prescriptive analytics) that provide, for the first time, an opportunity to capture human dynamics, natural phenomena, and complex infrastructures in optimization models. He applies evidence-based optimization to challenging applications in environmental and social resilience, energy systems, marketing, social networks, and transportation. Key research topics include the integration of predictive (machine learning, simulation, stochastic approximation) and prescriptive analytics (optimization under uncertainty), as well as the integration of strategic, tactical, and operational models.

The video above is of a planned evacuation of 70,000 persons for a 1-100 year flood in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Region using both predictive and prescriptive analytics and large data sets for the terrain, the population, and the transportation network.

Raj Rao Nadakuditi

By |

Raj Nadakuditi, PhD, is Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Nadakuditi received his Masters and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT as part of the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Ocean Science and Engineering. His work is at the interface of statistical signal processing and random matrix theory with applications such as sonar, radar, wireless communications and machine learning in mind.

Prof. Nadakuditi particularly enjoys using random matrix theory to address problems that arise in statistical signal processing. An important component of his work is applying it in real-world settings to tease out low-level signals from sensor, oceanographic, financial and econometric time/frequency measurements/time series. In addition to the satisfaction derived from transforming the theory into practice, real-world settings give us insight into how the underlying techniques can be refined and/or made more robust.