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Kai S. Cortina

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Kai S. Cortina, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cortina’s major research revolves around the understanding of children’s and adolescents’ pathways into adulthood and the role of the educational system in this process. The academic and psycho-social development is analyzed from a life-span perspective exclusively analyzing longitudinal data over longer periods of time (e.g., from middle school to young adulthood). The hierarchical structure of the school system (student/classroom/school/district/state/nations) requires the use of statistical tools that can handle these kind of nested data.

 

Jun Zhang

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Jun Zhang, PhD, is Professor of Mathematics and Psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Zhang develops algebraic and geometric methods for data analysis. Algebraic methods are based on theories of topology and partially ordered sets (in particular lattice theory); an example being formal concept analysis (FCA). Geometric methods include Information Geometry, which studies the manifold of probability density functions. He interests include mathematical psychology and computational neuroscience, broadly defined to include neural network theory and reinforcement learning, dynamical analysis of nervous system (single neuron activity and event-related potential), computational vision, choice-reaction time model, Bayesian decision theory and game theory.

Pamela Davis-Kean

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Pamela Davis-Kean, PhD, is Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Research Professor, Survey Research Center and Research Center for Group Dynamics, Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Davis-Kean is the Director of the Population, Neurodevelopment, and Genetics program at the Institute for Social Research. This group examines the complex transactions of brain, biology, and behavior as children and families develop across time. She is interested in both micro (brain and biology) and macro (family and socioeconomic conditions) aspects of development to understand the full developmental story of individuals.  Her primary focus in this area is how stress relates to family socioeconomic status and how that translates to parenting beliefs and behaviors that influence the development of children.

Rich Gonzalez

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My research makes use of state-of-the-art statistical learning and exploratory tools to answer questions at the interface of biology and behavioral science.