Brian P. McCall

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My interests are in the areas of labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. Currently my research focuses on college student debt accumulation and the subsequent risk of default, the effect of tuition subsidies on college attendance, the influence of family wealth on college attendance and completion, the effect of financial aid packages on college attendance, completion and subsequent labor market earnings, the influence of education on job displacement and subsequent earnings, the impact of unemployment insurance rules on unemployment durations and re-employment wages, and the determinants and consequences of repeat use of the unemployment insurance system.

Matthew Shapiro

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Prof. Shapiro is the Lawrence R. Klein Collegiate Professor of Economics, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Shapiro’s general area of research is macroeconomics. He has studied investment and capital utilization, business-cycle fluctuations, consumption and saving, financial markets, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and time-series econometrics. Among his current research interests are consumption, saving, retirement, and portfolio choices of households, the effects of tax policy on investment, using surveys in macroeconomics, and improving the quality of national economic statistics.

Matias D. Cattaneo

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Matias D. Cattaneo, Ph.D., is Professor of Economics and Statistics in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cattaneo’s research interests include econometric theory, mathematical statistics, and applied econometrics, with focus on causal inference, program evaluation, high-dimensional problems and applied microeconomics. Most of his recent research relates to the development of new, improved semiparametric, nonparametric and high-dimensional inference procedures exhibiting demonstrable superior robustness properties with respect to tuning parameter and other implementation choices. His work is motivated by concrete empirical problems in social, biomedical and statistical sciences, covering a wide array of topics in settings related to treatment effects and policy evaluation, high-dimensional models, average derivatives and structural response functions, applied finance and applied decision theory, among others.