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S. Sriram

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S. Sriram, PhD, is Associate Professor of Marketing in the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Sriram’s research interests are in the areas of brand and product portfolio management, multi-sided platforms, healthcare policy, and online education. His research uses state of the art econometric methods to answer important managerial and policy-relevant questions. He has studied topics such as measuring and tracking brand equity and optimal allocation of resources to maintain long-term brand profitability, cannibalization, consumer adoption of technology products, and strategies for multi-sided platforms. Substantively, his research has spanned several industries including consumer packaged goods, technology products and services, retailing, news media, the interface of healthcare and marketing, and MOOCs.

Antonios M. Koumpias

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Antonios M. Koumpias, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Economics in the department of Social Sciences at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. Prof. Koumpias is an applied microeconomist with research interests in public economics, with an emphasis on behavioral tax compliance, and health economics. In his research, he employs quasi-experimental methods to disentangle the causal impact of policy interventions that occur at the aggregate (e.g. states) or the individual (e.g. taxpayers) level in a comparative case study setting. Namely, he relies on regression discontinuity designs, regression kink designs, matching methods, and synthetic control methods to perform program evaluation that estimates the causal treatment effect of the policy in question. Examples include the use of a regression discontinuity design to estimate the impact of a tax compliance reminders on payments of overdue income tax liabilities in Greece, matching methods to measure the influence of mass media campaigns in Pakistan on income tax filing and the synthetic control method to evaluate the long-term effect of state Medicaid expansions on mortality.

Evolution of Annual Changes in All-cause Childless Adult Mortality in New York State following 2001 State Medicaid Expansion

Jinseok Kim

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Jinseok Kim, Ph.D., is Research Assistant Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  Prof. Kim works on resolving named entity ambiguity in large-scale scholarly data (publication, patent, and funding records) in digital libraries. Especially, his current research is focused on developing methods for disambiguating author and affiliation names at a digital library scale using various supervised machine learning approaches trained on automatically labeled data . Disambiguated data from multiple sources will be integrated to be analyzed for insights into research production, scientific collaboration, funding evaluation, and research policy at a national level.

Brian P. McCall

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My interests are in the areas of labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. Currently my research focuses on college student debt accumulation and the subsequent risk of default, the effect of tuition subsidies on college attendance, the influence of family wealth on college attendance and completion, the effect of financial aid packages on college attendance, completion and subsequent labor market earnings, the influence of education on job displacement and subsequent earnings, the impact of unemployment insurance rules on unemployment durations and re-employment wages, and the determinants and consequences of repeat use of the unemployment insurance system.

Rocio Titiunik

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Prof. Titiunik’s research interests lie primarily in quantitative methodology for the social sciences, with emphasis on quasi-experimental methods for causal inference and political methodology. She is particularly interested in the application and development of non-experimental methods for the study of political institutions, a methodological agenda that is motivated by her substantive interests on democratic accountability and the role of party systems in developing democracies. Some of her current projects include the application of web scraping and text analysis tools to measure political phenomena.

Michael Traugott

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Michael Traugott, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Communication Studies, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Research Professor Emeritus, Center for Political Studies and Adjunct Research Professor, Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social Research.

Professor Traugott studies the mass media and their impact on American politics. This includes research on the use of the media by candidates in their campaigns and its impact on voters, as well as the ways that campaigns are covered and the impact of this coverage on candidates. He has a particular interest in the use of surveys and polls and the way news organizations employ them to cover campaigns and elections.

Colter Mitchell

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Dr. Mitchell’s research focuses on the causes and consequences of family formation behavior. He examines how social context such as neighborhood resources and values influence family processes and how those processes interplay with an individual’s genetic and epigenetic makeup to influence behavior, wellbeing, and health. His research also includes the development of new methods for integrating the collection and analysis of biological and social data.

Thomas Finholt

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Thomas Finholt is the Dean and Professor of Information at the School of Information. His current research focuses on: the energy costs of forming and maintaining social ties; computational mediation of trust in virtual organizations; and use of ultra-resolution collaboration environments.

Matias D. Cattaneo

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Matias D. Cattaneo, Ph.D., is Professor of Economics and Statistics in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cattaneo’s research interests include econometric theory, mathematical statistics, and applied econometrics, with focus on causal inference, program evaluation, high-dimensional problems and applied microeconomics. Most of his recent research relates to the development of new, improved semiparametric, nonparametric and high-dimensional inference procedures exhibiting demonstrable superior robustness properties with respect to tuning parameter and other implementation choices. His work is motivated by concrete empirical problems in social, biomedical and statistical sciences, covering a wide array of topics in settings related to treatment effects and policy evaluation, high-dimensional models, average derivatives and structural response functions, applied finance and applied decision theory, among others.

Zeina Mneimneh

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Dr. Zeina Mneimneh is Assistant Research Scientist in the University of Michigan Survey Research Center.

Her research focuses on the use of social media and neighborhood contextual information to study social and health science topics and involves a collaboration between Michigan and Georgetown University.