Kai S. Cortina

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Kai S. Cortina, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cortina’s major research revolves around the understanding of children’s and adolescents’ pathways into adulthood and the role of the educational system in this process. The academic and psycho-social development is analyzed from a life-span perspective exclusively analyzing longitudinal data over longer periods of time (e.g., from middle school to young adulthood). The hierarchical structure of the school system (student/classroom/school/district/state/nations) requires the use of statistical tools that can handle these kind of nested data.

 

Romesh P. Nalliah

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Dr. Nalliah’s expertise in research focuses on process evaluation. He has studied healthcare delivery processes, educational processes and healthcare outcomes. Dr. Nalliah’s research studies were the first time nationwide data was used to highlight hospital resource utilization for managing dental caries, pulpal lesions, periapical lesions and general oral conditions in the United States. Dr. Nalliah is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the field of nationwide hospital dataset research for dental conditions and has numerous publications in peer reviewed journals.

Dr. Nalliah’s interest for future research is to expand experience in various areas of public health but not forget his connection to dentistry. Dr. Nalliah has conducted research related to gun violence, facial fractures, spinal fusion, oral cancer, dental conditions, educational debt, mental health, suicide, sports injuries, poisoning and the characteristics of patients discharged against medical advice. National recognition of his expertise in these broader topics of medicine have given rise to opportunities to lecture to medical residents, nurse practitioners, students in medical, pharmacy and nursing programs about oral health. This is his passion- that his research should inform an evolution of dental and health education curriculum and practice.

Dr. Nalliah’s passion in research is improving healthcare delivery systems and he’s interested in improving processes, minimizing inefficiencies, reducing healthcare bottlenecks, increasing quality, and increase task sharing which will lead to a patient-centered, coherent healthcare system. Dr. Nalliah’s research has identified systems constraints and his goal is to influence policy and planning to break those constraints and improve healthcare delivery.

Jason Owen-Smith

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Our data architecture combines naturally-occurring data from research grant inputs with scientific outputs including publications, citations, dissertations, and patents, as well as with biographic data on researchers scraped from the web and in databases. These data integrate with STAR METRICS administrative data on grant purchases and employment, which can in turn be linked to Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) Census data enabling individuals to be traced as they move across employers and start businesses. These data are then linked using cutting edge disambiguation/name-entity resolution, web scraping and entity extraction. This IRIS methodology is advancing the underlying computational sciences and creating more useful data for broader applications.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

Muzammil M. Hussain

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Muzammil M. Hussain is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, and Faculty Associate in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Hussain’s interdisciplinary research is at the intersections of global communication, comparative politics, and complexity studies. At Michigan, Professor Hussain teaches courses on research methods, digital politics, and global innovation. His published books include “Democracy’s Fourth Wave? Digital Media and the Arab Spring” (Oxford University Press, 2013), a cross-national comparative study of how digital media and information technologies have supported the opening-up of closed societies in the MENA, and “State Power 2.0: Authoritarian Entrenchment and Political Engagement Worldwide” (Ashgate Publishing, 2013), an international collection detailing how governments, both democracies and dictatorships, are working to close-down digital systems and environments around the world. He has authored numerous research articles, book chapters, and industry reports examining global ICT politics, innovation, and policy, including pieces in The Journal of Democracy, The Journal of International Affairs, The Brookings Institution’s Issues in Technology and Innovation, The InterMedia Institute’s Development Research Series, International Studies Review, International Journal of Middle East Affairs, The Communication Review, Policy and Internet, and Journalism: Theory, Practice, and Criticism.

Twitter: @m_m_hussain.

Brian Perron

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Brian E. Perron, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Social Work. Dr. Perron received his Ph.D. from Washington University in St. Louis and a specialization in Data Science from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Perron has extensive experience in services research for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. His research (NCBI, Google Scholar) has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veterans Affairs, and the State of Michigan. He recently published books on the topics of measurement (Oxford University Press) and social work practice (Sage Publications). Dr. Perron’s recent work focuses on helping community-based organizations more effectively use administrative data to improve service delivery and other business processes.This includes developing user-friendly and sustainable data management systems; using data visualizations to facilitate interpretation of data, especially for non-technical users; and building organizational capacity to promote data-driven decision making.

Gerald Davis

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My research is broadly concerned with corporate governance and the effects of finance on society. Recent writings examine how ideas about corporate social responsibility have evolved to meet changes in the structures and geographic footprint of multinational corporations; whether “shareholder capitalism” is still a viable model for economic development; how income inequality in an economy is related to corporate size and structure; why theories about organizations do (or do not) progress; how architecture shapes social networks and innovation in organizations; why stock markets spread to some countries and not others; and whether there exist viable organizational alternatives to shareholder-owned corporations in the United States. Recent publications are available at http://webuser.bus.umich.edu/gfdavis/articles.htm.

Ties Among the Fortune 1000 Corporate Boards

Ties Among the Fortune 1000 Corporate Boards