Peter Adriaens

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Peter Adriaens, PhD, is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Professor of Environment and Sustainability, School for Environment and Sustainability and Professor of Entrepreneurship, Stephen M Ross School of Business, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Adriaens’ research focuses on the use of data science to uncover trends and features in a range of financial (‘fintech’) applications relevant to economic development and investments aimed at catalyzing sustainable growth, including:
1. Network mapping to query relations in financial networks using visualization techniques
2. Trend and features prediction of value capture and investment grade in startup business models, using machine learning, natural language processing, and decision tools
3. Asset risk pricing of stocks exposed to water risk in their supply chains, using statistical methods, and portfolio theory predictions
4. Financial risk modeling of multi-asset investment funds to drive low carbon economies, leveraging network mapping, and machine learning.

 

Structure of financial data-driven industry ecosystems following relational network mapping and network theory application.

Structure of financial data-driven industry ecosystems following relational network mapping and network theory application.

Jon Zelner

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Jon Zelner, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the department of Epidemiology in the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Zelner holds a second appointment in the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health.

Dr. Zelner’s research is focused on using spatial analysis, social network analyisis and dynamic modeling to prevent infectious diseases, with a focus on tuberculosis and diarrheal disease. Jon is also interested in understanding how the social and biological causes of illness interact to generate observable patterns of disease in space and in social networks, across outcomes ranging from infection to mental illness.

 

A large spatial cluster of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in Lima, Peru is highlighted in red. A key challenge in my work is understanding why these cases cluster in space: can social, spatial, and genetic data tell us where transmission is occurring and how to interrupt it?

A large spatial cluster of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in Lima, Peru is highlighted in red. A key challenge in my work is understanding why these cases cluster in space: can social, spatial, and genetic data tell us where transmission is occurring and how to interrupt it?

 

 

Adriene Beltz

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The goal of my research is to leverage network analysis techniques to uncover how the brain mediates sex hormone influences on gendered behavior across the lifespan. Specifically, my data science research concerns the creation and application of person-specific connectivity analyses, such as unified structural equation models, to time series data; these are intensive longitudinal data, including functional neuroimages, daily diaries, and observations. I then use these data science methods to investigate the links between androgens (e.g., testosterone) and estradiol at key developmental periods, such as puberty, and behaviors that typically show sex differences, including aspects of cognition and psychopathology.

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

Necmiye Ozay

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Necmiye Ozay, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Ozay and her team develop the scientific foundations and associated algorithmic tools for compactly representing and analyzing heterogeneous data streams from sensor/information-rich networked dynamical systems. They take a unified dynamics-based and data-driven approach for the design of passive and active monitors for anomaly detection in such systems. Dynamical models naturally capture temporal (i.e., causal) relations within data streams. Moreover, one can use hybrid and networked dynamical models to capture, respectively, logical relations and interactions between different data sources. They study structural properties of networks and dynamics to understand fundamental limitations of anomaly detection from data. By recasting information extraction problem as a networked hybrid system identification problem, they bring to bear tools from computer science, system and control theory and convex optimization to efficiently and rigorously analyze and organize information. The applications include diagnostics, anomaly and change detection in critical infrastructure such as building management systems, transportation and energy networks.

Ming Xu

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Ming Xu, PhD, is Associate Professor in the School of Environment and Sustainability with a secondary appointment as Associate Professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Xu’s research focuses on developing and applying computational and data-enabled methodology in the broader area of sustainability. Main thrusts are as follows:

1. Human mobility dynamics. I am interested in mining large-scale real-world travel trajectory data to understand human mobility dynamics. This involves the processing and analyzing travel trajectory data, characterizing individual mobility patterns, and evaluating environmental impacts of transportation systems/technologies (e.g., electric vehicles, ride-sharing) based on individual mobility dynamics.

2. Global supply chains. Increasingly intensified international trade has created a connected global supply chain network. I am interested in understanding the structure of the global supply chain network and economic/environmental performance of nations.

3. Networked infrastructure systems. Many infrastructure systems (e.g., power grid, water supply infrastructure) are networked systems. I am interested in understanding the basic structural features of these systems and how they relate to the system-level properties (e.g., stability, resilience, sustainability).

 

Jason Owen-Smith

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Our data architecture combines naturally-occurring data from research grant inputs with scientific outputs including publications, citations, dissertations, and patents, as well as with biographic data on researchers scraped from the web and in databases. These data integrate with STAR METRICS administrative data on grant purchases and employment, which can in turn be linked to Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) Census data enabling individuals to be traced as they move across employers and start businesses. These data are then linked using cutting edge disambiguation/name-entity resolution, web scraping and entity extraction. This IRIS methodology is advancing the underlying computational sciences and creating more useful data for broader applications.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

Luis E. Ortiz

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Luis Ortiz, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Dearborn

The study of large complex systems of structured strategic interaction, such as economic, social, biological, financial, or large computer networks, provides substantial opportunities for fundamental computational and scientific contributions. Luis’ research focuses on problems emerging from the study of systems involving the interaction of a large number of “entities,” which is my way of abstractly and generally capturing individuals, institutions, corporations, biological organisms, or even the individual chemical components of which they are made (e.g., proteins and DNA). Current technology has facilitated the collection and public availability of vasts amounts of data, particularly capturing system behavior at fine levels of granularity. In Luis’ group, they study behavioral data of strategic nature at big data levels. One of their main objectives is to develop computational tools for data science, and in particular learning large-population models from such big sources of behavioral data that we can later use to study, analyze, predict and alter future system behavior at a variety of scales, and thus improve the overall efficiency of real-world complex systems (e.g., the smart grid, social and political networks, independent security and defense systems, and microfinance markets, to name a few).

Danai Koutra

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I develop fast and principled methods for exploring and understanding one or more massive graphs. In addition to fast algorithmic methodologies, my research also contributes graph-theoretical ideas and models, and real-world applications in two main areas: (i) Single-graph exploration, which includes graph summarization and inference; (ii) Multiple-graph exploration, which includes summarization of time-evolving graphs, graph similarity and network alignment. My research is applied mainly to social, collaboration and web networks, as well as brain connectivity graphs.

Elizaveta Levina

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Elizaveta (Liza) Levina and her group work on various questions arising in the statistical analysis of large and complex data, especially networks and graphs. Our current focus is on developing rigorous and computationally efficient statistical inference on realistic models for networks. Current directions include community detection problems in networks (overlapping communities, networks with additional information about the nodes and edges, estimating the number of communities), link prediction (networks with missing or noisy links, networks evolving over time), prediction with data connected by a network (e.g., the role of friendship networks in the spread of risky behaviors among teenagers), and statistical analysis of samples of networks with applications to brain imaging, especially fMRI data from studies of mental health).

Pascal Van Hentenryck

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Pascal Van Hentenryck, Phd, is the Seth Bonder Collegiate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

His research is concerned with evidence-based optimization, the idea of optimizing complex systems holistically, exploiting the unprecedented amount of available data. It is driven by an exciting convergence of ideas in big data, predictive analytics, and large-scale optimization (prescriptive analytics) that provide, for the first time, an opportunity to capture human dynamics, natural phenomena, and complex infrastructures in optimization models. He applies evidence-based optimization to challenging applications in environmental and social resilience, energy systems, marketing, social networks, and transportation. Key research topics include the integration of predictive (machine learning, simulation, stochastic approximation) and prescriptive analytics (optimization under uncertainty), as well as the integration of strategic, tactical, and operational models.

The video above is of a planned evacuation of 70,000 persons for a 1-100 year flood in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Region using both predictive and prescriptive analytics and large data sets for the terrain, the population, and the transportation network.