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Samuel K Handelman

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Samuel K Handelman, Ph.D., is Research Assistant Professor in the department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, of Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Prof. Handelman is focused on multi-omics approaches to drive precision/personalized-therapy and to predict population-level differences in the effectiveness of interventions. He tends to favor regression-style and hierarchical-clustering approaches, partially because he has a background in both statistics and in cladistics. His scientific monomania is for compensatory mechanisms and trade-offs in evolution, but he has a principled reason to focus on translational medicine: real understanding of these mechanisms goes all the way into the clinic. Anything less that clinical translation indicates that we don’t understand what drove the genetics of human populations.

Peter Adriaens

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My research focus is on the development and application of machine learning tools to large scale financial and unstructured (textual) data to extract, quantify and predict risk profiles and investment grade rating of private and public companies.  Example datasets include social media and financial aggregators such as Bloomberg, Pitchbook, and Privco.

Steven J. Katz

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Dr. Katz’s research addresses cancer treatment communication, decision-making, and quality of care. His work aims to examine the dynamics of how precision medicine presents itself in the exam room via provider and patient communication and shared decision-making. Dr. Katz leads the Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes Research Team (CanSORT), an interdisciplinary research program centered at the University of Michigan and focused on population and intervention studies of the quality of care and outcomes of cancer detection and treatment in diverse populations.  Dr. Katz and CanSORT have been collaborating with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries since 2002 to study breast cancer treatment decision making at the population level. We obtain patient clinical and demographic information from SEER and combine this with surveys of patients and physicians to create comprehensive data sets that enable us to study testing and treatment trends and the challenges of individualizing treatments for breast cancer patients. In 2015 we added a new dimension to our research by partnering with evaluative testing firms to obtain tumor genomic and germline genetic test results for over 30,000 breast and ovarian cancer patients in the states of California and Georgia. We are also pursuing insurance claims data to assist with our analysis of physician network effects.

Steven Katz, MD discusses BRCA and multigene sequence testing at the labs of Ambry Genetics.

Steven Katz, MD discusses BRCA and multigene sequence testing at the labs of Ambry Genetics.

Perry Samson

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The capacity to predict student success depends in part on our ability to understand “educationally purposeful” student behaviors and motivations and the relationship between behaviors and motivations and academic achievement. My research focuses on how to collect student behaviors germane to learning at a higher granularity and analyze the relationships between student performance and behaviors.

Ultimately this research is aimed at designing and constructing an “earlier warning system” wherein student guidance is quasi-automated and informed by motivation, background and behaviors and delivered within weeks of the beginning of classes.

Jeremy M G Taylor

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Jeremy Taylor, PhD, is the Pharmacia Research Professor of Biostatistics in the School of Public Health and Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology in the School of Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is the director of the University of Michigan Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit and director of the Cancer/Biostatistics training program. He received his B.A. in Mathematics from Cambridge University and his Ph.D. in Statistics from UC Berkeley. He was on the faculty at UCLA from 1983 to 1998, when he moved to the University of Michigan. He has had visiting positions at the Medical Research Council, Cambridge, England; the University of Adelaide; INSERM, Bordeaux and CSIRO, Sydney, Australia. He is a previously winner of the Mortimer Spiegelman Award from the American Public Health Association and the Michael Fry Award from the Radiation Research Society. He has worked in various areas of Statistics and Biostatistics, including Box-Cox transformations, longitudinal and survival analysis, cure models, missing data, smoothing methods, clinical trial design, surrogate and auxiliary variables. He has been heavily involved in collaborations in the areas of radiation oncology, cancer research and bioinformatics.

I have broad interests and expertise in developing statistical methodology and applying it in biomedical research, particularly in cancer research. I have undertaken research  in power transformations, longitudinal modeling, survival analysis particularly cure models, missing data methods, causal inference and in modeling radiation oncology related data.  Recent interests, specifically related to cancer, are in statistical methods for genomic data, statistical methods for evaluating cancer biomarkers, surrogate endpoints, phase I trial design, statistical methods for personalized medicine and prognostic and predictive model validation.  I strive to develop principled methods that will lead to valid interpretations of the complex data that is collected in biomedical research.

William Currie

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Bill Currie studies how physical, chemical, and ecological processes work together in the functioning of ecosystems such as forests and wetlands.  He studies how human impacts and management alter key ecosystem responses including nutrient retention, carbon storage, plant species interactions, and plant productivity.   Dr. Currie uses computer models of ecosystems, including models in which he leads the development team, to explore ecosystem function across the spectrum from wildland to heavily human-impacted systems.  He often works in collaborative groups where a model is used to provide synthesis.  

He is committed to the idea that researchers must work together across traditional fields to address the complex environmental and sustainability issues of the 21st century.  He collaborates with field ecologists, geographers, remote sensing scientists, hydrologists, and land management professionals.

 

Stilian A. Stoev

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Stilian Stoev’s research is in the area of applied probability and statistics for stochastic processes with emphasis on extremes, heavy tails, self-similarity, and long-range dependence. His recent theoretical contributions are in the area of max-stable processes, which is the class of processes emerging as a canonical model for the dependence in the extremes. This includes the representation, characterization, ergodicity, mixing, and prediction for this class of processes. Dr. Stoev is also working on applied problems in the area of computer network traffic monitoring, analysis and modeling. A recent joint project focuses on developing efficient statistical methods and algorithms for the visualization and analysis of fast multi-gigabit network traffic streams, which can help unveil the structure of traffic flows, detect anomalies and cyber attacks in real-time. This involves advanced low-level packet capture, efficient computation and rapid communication of summary statistics using non-relational data bases. More broadly, Dr. Stoev’s research is motivated by large-scale and data intensive applied problems arising in the areas of:

  1. environmental, weather and climate extremes.
  2. insurance and finance.
  3. Internet traffic monitoring, modeling and prediction.
Hash-binned array of 10+Gbps traffic stream measured at Merit Network. Bin (i,j) corresponds to traffic intensity in bytes of the data transferred from source IPs hashed in bin i with corresponding destination IPs hashed in bin j. The picture corresponds to a 10 second aggregation period. Bright horizontal lines indicate server-type communication from one bin to many, while unusual vertical lines are indicative of distributed denial of service (DDoS) type many-to-one attacks. The data were obtained using the PF_RING module in zero-copy mode, which by-passes the OS kernel and processes all packets passing through the interface. These and related statistical summaries derived via a recently developed AMON (All packet MONintoring) framework allows for a near-instantaneous visualization and automatic detection of structural changes in the network traffic conditions.

Hash-binned array of 10+Gbps traffic stream measured at Merit Network. Bin (i,j) corresponds to traffic intensity in bytes of the data transferred from source IPs hashed in bin i with corresponding destination IPs hashed in bin j. The picture corresponds to a 10 second aggregation period. Bright horizontal lines indicate server-type communication from one bin to many, while unusual vertical lines are indicative of distributed denial of service (DDoS) type many-to-one attacks.
The data were obtained using the PF_RING module in zero-copy mode, which by-passes the OS kernel and processes all packets passing through the interface. These and related statistical summaries derived via a recently developed AMON (All packet MONintoring) framework allows for a near-instantaneous visualization and automatic detection of structural changes in the network traffic conditions.

Roderick Little

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Roderick Joseph Little, PhD, is the Richard D. Remington Distinguished University Professor of Biostatistics, Professor of Statistics, Research Professor, Institute for Social Research, and Senior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Little’s primary research interest is the analysis of data sets with missing values. Many statistical techniques are designed for complete, rectangular data sets, but in practice biostatistical data sets contain missing values, either by design or accident. As detailed in my book with Rubin, initial statistical approaches were relatively ad-hoc, such as discarding incomplete cases or substituting means, but modern methods are increasingly based on models for the data and missing-data mechanism, using likelihood-based inferential techniques.

Another interest is the analysis of data collected by complex sampling designs involving stratification and clustering of units. Since working as a statistician for the World Fertility Survey, I have been interested in the development of model-based methods for survey analysis that are robust to misspecification, reasonably efficient, and capable of implementation in applied settings. Statistics is philosophically fascinating and diverse in application. My inferential philosophy is model-based and Bayesian, although the effects of model misspecification need careful attention. My applied interests are broad, including mental health, demography, environmental statistics, biology, economics and the social sciences as well as biostatistics.

Xuming He

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Research interests include quantile regression modeling for associations related to possibly unusual or extreme events, subgroup analysis, and uncertainty quantification after model selection.